June 2019: Stormy and Wet with a Warm Finish

June 2019 will be a month remembered for a continuation of above average precipitation and near to seasonably cool temperatures, despite an unseasonably warm finish.

Preliminary data suggest that June 2019 concluded wetter than average, with temperatures slightly below the long-term average. The preliminary average statewide June temperature was 71.0°F, which is 0.9°F below the long-term average. The preliminary average statewide precipitation was 5.39 inches, which is 1.18 inches above the long-term average.

Data are provisional and may change slightly over time

Precipitation and Flooding

After near historic crests at multiple gages along both the Illinois and Mississippi rivers early in the month, water levels continued to slowly recede for many regions heading into July.  However, above average precipitation in June, combined with calculated soil moisture content remaining in the 90th to 99th percentile across Illinois, leaves the state with an elevated risk of continued flooding over the next month, especially in regions that may be affected by storms or locally heavy rainfall.

Flooding concerns along Lake Michigan were common in June. According to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, water levels in the Lake Michigan-Huron system have risen by nearly 5 inches throughout the month. By the end of June, average levels were reported to be 33 inches, or about 2.75 feet above the historical June average.  These levels set a new June record by nearly 2 inches. Water levels of this magnitude haven’t been exceeded since 1986.

Preliminary results show that the June 2019 statewide precipitation total of 5.39 inches was 1.18 inches above the long-term average.  This marks the 8th consecutive month in which no part of Illinois has been listed as in drought or abnormally dry by the U.S. Drought Monitor, and the 7th consecutive month with above average statewide precipitation.

June rainfall in Illinois was not evenly distributed. Several regions in the northern half of the state reported precipitation totals slightly below to near average for the month, with localized regions of above average precipitation. A large majority of the southern half of the state experienced more uniform above average precipitation departures, with numerous localities receiving 200 to 300% of normal (see maps below).

A gage near Cobden (Union County) reported the highest official precipitation total for June, with a reading of 10.73 inches.

Interactive June 2019 Climate Station Precipitation Map

Temperatures

Preliminary results show that June finished with a statewide average temperature of 71.0°F, which is 0.9°F below the long-term average.

The middle of the month was characterized by an extended period of unseasonably cool temperatures, while the start of astronomical summer brought a steady warming trend which allowed temperatures to reach into the upper 80s and 90s for the final days of June.

Temperature departures for the month were near to 1 to 3° below average, with average temperature values ranging from the mid-60s up into the mid-70s (see maps below).

The highest maximum temperature recorded in the state, at two separate stations, was 97°F, once at a station near Bentley (Hancock County) on June 5, and once at a station near Flora (Clay County) on June 30.

The lowest minimum temperature of only 43°F was reported in Danville (Vermilion County) on the morning of June 14.

Interactive June 2019 Climate Station Temperature Map

July 2019 Outlook

As we head into July, the monthly outlook from the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) favors slight probabilities for below average temperatures across most of the state, as well as continued probabilities of wetter than average conditions statewide.

 

 

 

May 2019: Exceptionally Wet and Stormy Across Illinois

May 2019 will be a month remembered for exceptional, record-breaking wet conditions locally, as well as an active, stormy, and at times severe weather pattern across the state.

Preliminary data suggest that May 2019 finished significantly wetter than average, with temperatures marginally below the long-term average. The preliminary average statewide May temperature was 62.5°F, which is 0.2°F below the long-term average. The preliminary average statewide precipitation was 8.43 inches, which is 3.83 inches above the long-term average.

Precipitation

Preliminary statewide average precipitation for May was 8.43 inches, which is 3.83 inches above the long-term average, marking six consecutive months with above average statewide precipitation. As it stands now, spring 2019 will rank within the top four wettest spring seasons in state history (March–May), with May 2019 ranking as the third wettest May in state history.

The multi-sensor precipitation departure map for Illinois shows that practically the entire state received above average precipitation for the month. The only exception was a small region in east-central Illinois near Edgar County, where near to slightly below average precipitation occurred (see maps below).

Portions of west-central and northern Illinois reported the heaviest rainfall for the month, where monthly precipitation departures of 5 to 8 inches above average were common, bringing 200 to 300 percent of average monthly rainfall.  An area roughly defined between Quincy and the Quad Cities extending eastward to near Peoria received the most precipitation in the state, with 7 rain gages in this region recording 13 or more inches of rainfall during May.

A gage near Dallas City (Hancock County) reported the highest precipitation total for May, with an impressive 14.75 inches.

Data from the National Weather Service showed that with a report of 8.25 inches, Chicago experienced its wettest May on record, beating the 8.21-inch reading that was set just last year in May 2018.

The abnormally wet May weather has led to a continuation of elevated flooding risks and significant planting delays for the Illinois agricultural community.  Moderate and major flooding along many local streams and rivers is still ongoing, with flood warnings along both the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers in effect until further notice.

Wet, active, and stormy weather has not only been an issue for Illinois, but also the weather has been a growing risk across much of the central and southern Midwest including the Corn Belt where notable above average precipitation departures for May were also present (see map below).

Severe Weather

In addition to the relentless rainfall, multiple rounds of severe weather impacted the state throughout the month. Statewide, 218 severe weather reports were noted from the Storm Prediction Center, 20 for tornadoes (red), 52 for hail (green), and 146 for wind (blue). Note that multiple reports may be generated for a single event.

Map of May 2019 Severe Weather Reports in Illinois, updated 6/4/2019

Temperature

Preliminary results show that May 2019 finished with a statewide average temperature of 62.5°F, which is 0.2°F below the long-term average.

Monthly temperature departures showed that the northern third of the state generally saw average temperatures of 1 to 3 degrees below normal, while the southern third of the state generally saw average temperatures of 1 to 3 degrees above normal, with near normal temperatures occurring throughout central Illinois.

The highest maximum temperature in the state was recorded at the Kaskaskia River Navigation Lock (Randolph County) with a reading of 93°F on May 26. In contrast, the lowest minimum temperature of 31°F was recorded at the Chicago Botanical Garden (Cook County) on May 4.

June 2019

Although an active weather pattern looks to continue at least for a portion of the first full week of June, the monthly outlook from the Climate Prediction Center favors equal probabilities for below, near, or above average precipitation and temperatures across Illinois for June 2019.

Rainfall Over the Last 2 Weeks in Illinois

 
Here are the amounts for the last week, as of this morning. The areas in purple in far southern Illinois have received between 10 and 15 inches. Areas in shades of red have received between 5 and 10 inches. The areas in orange and yellow have received between 2 and 5 inches. Areas in green in northwest IL have received between  0.5 and 2 inches.
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Here are the rainfall totals for the past two weeks. Same color scheme as before. Notice how the areas with 10 to 15 inches have expanded across much of southern IL south of Interstate 64 with a few areas just to the north.
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NWS Cooperative Observer Network rainfall totals in Illinois for the period of April 26 to May 5, 2017, ranked from high to low. Totals that have exceeded the expected 10-day, 100-year rainfall amounts for that area are in red. Continue reading “Rainfall Over the Last 2 Weeks in Illinois”

Wet April and 2nd Warmest January-April on Record for Illinois

Precipitation: The statewide average precipitation for April in Illinois was 7.01 inches, 3.23 inches above normal and the 2nd wettest April on record. Here are the top five wettest Aprils. Notice a pattern? Three out of the five have been since 2011.

  1. April 2011 – 7.62 inches
  2. April 2017 – 7.01 inches
  3. April 1957 – 6.99 inches
  4. April 2013 – 6.93 inches
  5. April 1927 – 6.87 inches

The largest monthly total for April in Illinois was Carbondale with 14.41 inches. Several other sites in southern Illinois had similar amounts including Bush (Williamson County) with 13.63 inches, West Frankfort (Franklin County) with 13.35 inches, Kaskaskia (Randolph County) with 13.34 inches, and Murphysboro (Jackson County) with 13.02 inches.
Temperature: The statewide average temperature for April was 56.4 degrees, 3.8 degrees above average and the 11th warmest April on record. The warmest reading for April was 89 degrees at Kaskaskia on April 20.  The coldest reading for the month was 19 degrees at Morrison on April 10.
Statewide records of temperature and precipitation go back to 1895.

Graphs

Here are the temperature departures for 2017. As you can see, every month in 2017 has been well above normal. So far this January-April is the 2nd warmest such period on record with a statewide average temperature of 43.2 degrees, 5.4 degrees above normal. Only 2012 was warmer at 44.5 degrees, 6.7 degrees above normal. [corrected from an earlier version]
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Continue reading “Wet April and 2nd Warmest January-April on Record for Illinois”

Widespread, heavy rains possible over next week in Illinois

As of April 25, the statewide average precipitation for Illinois is 2.8 inches, which is 94% of normal. However, we have several opportunities for widespread rains this week and into the weekend, according to the NWS precipitation forecast.
The first round of rain on Wednesday and Thursday has potential rainfall amounts of 1 to 2 inches across most of Illinois, along with the chance for severe weather. Continue reading “Widespread, heavy rains possible over next week in Illinois”

5-Day Rainfall in Illinois and Midwest

Here are the 5-day accumulated rainfall totals for Illinois and the Midwest. Rainfall was heaviest south of Interstate 70 where amounts of 4 to 8 inches were common (lighter shades of blue). The largest 5-day rainfall total was from a CoCoRaHS station at Waltonville (IL-JF-2) with 10.79 inches. CoCoRaHS is a national network of trained volunteer precipitation observers, learn more at cocorahs.org
Continue reading “5-Day Rainfall in Illinois and Midwest”

100-Year Storm Strikes Illinois State Fair

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Radar-estimated rainfall from August 12 storm.

The 5.59 inches of rain reported at the Springfield Airport on Friday night fell in 6 hours. This represents the 100-year storm for that duration in central Illinois, according to Bulletin 70. The results were dramatic, as reported by the Springfield Journal Register.
The concept of the 100 year storm is commonly used by engineers for assessing the risk of heavy rainfall. The 100-year storm is more completely described as the storm expected to have a return period of once every 100 years on average. The phrase “on average” being key. It does not mean the storms are exactly 100 years apart. Instead it means that if you look at rainfall statistics long enough the average frequency of such a storm would be 100 years. Unfortunately, we don’t have hundreds of years of rainfall data. Instead we estimate the values based on fitting a statistical model to the observed data.
While the phrase “100-year storm” is eye catching, it does not do a good job conveying the risk of such an event. A better way of describing it would be the “1% chance storm”, Continue reading “100-Year Storm Strikes Illinois State Fair”

Heavy Rains on August 12-15

As forecasted by the National Weather Service, heavy rains have fallen across Illinois since Friday. Here are the totals by day and for the three days combined. More rain is expected today and tomorrow (last map). Friday’s rainfall is shown on the 24-hour totals for the morning of August 13, etc. We have had a stationary front parked over Illinois since Friday, which is usually a key ingredient for getting significant rainfall amount.
Here is the set of maps showing the rainfall totals for each day, using rain-gage calibrated rainfall totals. It provides a higher level of details with fairly good accuracy. The downside is that the color scale changes slightly from map to map.

Rainfall totals for the morning of August 13, 2016

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Morning of August 13, 2016.

Rainfall totals for the morning of August 14, 2016

Continue reading “Heavy Rains on August 12-15”

Flooding – Deadly Risk in Illinois with 28 Deaths in 19 Years

Right now the attention is on the widespread flooding in Texas and Oklahoma, with the number of deaths sitting at 21 and climbing. Illinois has been faced with deadly flooding in the past. An examination of the national storm database reveals that Illinois has had 28 flood-related deaths in the last 19 years*.

Here are the numbers by year in Illinois. Some years like 2000, 2008, 2009, and 2013 were especially bad with 4 to 5 deaths each. A few years had no deaths, including 2004-07, 2012, and 2014. While not part of this database, six deaths were reported in Illinois during the 1993 flood, according the ISWS report.

Flood-related deaths in Illinois from 1996 to 2014, based on data from the National Climatic Data Center.
Flood-related deaths in Illinois from 1996 to 2014, based on data from the National Climatic Data Center.

Continue reading “Flooding – Deadly Risk in Illinois with 28 Deaths in 19 Years”